You Can’t Do It Alone (Feb 3)

youcantdoitalone

From Open Up Your Heart by Jeff Syverson

February 3
You Can’t Do It Alone

Today’s Scripture Readings: Psalms 19:1-6Exodus 17:8 – 19:15 | Matthew 22:34-23:12 | Proverbs 6:27-35

Today’s Scripture Focus: Exodus 17:8 – 19:15

“What you are doing is not good. You and these people who come to you will only wear yourselves out. The work is too heavy for you; you cannot handle it alone . . . . Select capable men from all the people–men who fear God, trustworthy men who hate dishonest gain–and appoint them as officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties and tens.” (Exodus 18:17-21 NIV)

A leader will never be great without the support of his people. He must recruit, train and delegate the work to capable, faithful men and women who can help accomplish the task.

A leader needs the support, prayers and encouragement of a few close associates. Moses needed Aaron and Hur to come along side him and lift up his arms. He needed Joshua to lead the troops.

The Amalekites attacked the Israelites (Ch. 17). Joshua was given the task of leading the people into battle. Moses would go to the top of the hill and lift up his staff. While he held up his arms, the Israelites were winning. But when his arms grew tired, the Amalekites would win. Moses couldn’t do it on his own. He needed Aaron and Hur to help hold up his arms.

The support and encouragement of your close associates is necessary if you are going to be a great leader. You need their prayers. You need their encouragement. You need their help. Aaron and Hur found their role in supporting Moses. Every pastor knows the value of men and women who take on the role of Aaron and Hur for them—especially those who will hold up their arms through their prayers.

But a few close associates is not enough for a great task. There is need for all to be involved–and there is especially a need for those who are faithful and capable to help carry the load of ministry.

Moses found himself judging all the disputes. It was too much for him. He was burning himself out. His father in law, Jethro, saw the problem and offered his advice: “Select capable men from all the people–men who fear God, trustworthy men who hate dishonest gain–and appoint them as officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties and tens. Have them serve as judges for the people at all times, but have them bring every difficult case to you; the simple cases they can decide themselves. That will make your load lighter, because they will share it with you. If you do this and God so commands, you will be able to stand the strain, and all these people will go home satisfied.”

A good leader knows how important it is to recruit and equip capable men and women to help do the work of ministry. You can’t do it alone. It’s just too much.

Your pastor needs your support, encouragement, prayer and willingness to help. He can’t do it alone. Your encouragement, support and prayers mean so much—they help hold up his hands and bring strength in the battle. Your willingness to help–to use your gifts–ensures that the workload is shared by the many rather than an overworked few. A healthy body requires that all the members do their part.

A great leader depends on the support and help of capable, trustworthy followers. Let’s work together to accomplish great things to the glory of God.

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About pastorjeffsneighborhood

Born and raised in Minnesota, I have served in churches in Minnesota, Ohio, Oregon and California. I am a graduate of Crown College (MN) and George Fox Evangelical Seminary (OR). I have also done additional graduate studies in New Testament Studies at the Center for Advanced Theological Studies at Fuller Theological Seminary (CA). I am also a graduate of the College of Prayer. Having served as the Academic Dean and Program Director at Horizon Institute of Los Angeles for several years, I have returned to the pastorate and serve as Pastor of Big Trees Community Bible Church in Arnold, CA.
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